Back Yard Chicken Diseases

Of course, this article, concerning four common chicken diseases pertains to anyone who raises chickens.  However,  Backyard, city raised, chicken raising is very popular and is a relatively new phenomenon.  So, I would venture to say that it is not a big assumption that people who raise chickens in the backyard would tend to have less knowledge when it comes to knowing about various diseases that chickens can get that are transferable to humans.  That is why this article, by Survival Life,  concerning dangerous chicken diseases is very helpful.  The following is a summary of what chicken diseases you should look out if you’re already or are thinking about raising chickens.

The article mentions these four common diseases, found in chickens, that can negatively affect humans and also basic steps to prevent this  from happening

Salmonella

This germ is quite common and is easily spread from human to human.

The Salmonella germs can attach to anything that the chickens touch. In turn, the germs cling on to people that get close (just like what parasites do to the body). These people are likely to become infected if they place their hands close to their mouths. Among the effects of this germ to the body includes diarrhea and intense weakening. That’s why, after touching or getting anywhere near the chickens, it is advised you should immediately wash and scrub your hands vigorously. That would lessen the chances of you getting sick because of Salmonella. 4 Human Diseases Caused By Chickens | Survival Life

Salmonella poisoning does not initially look like it could be fatal to an average, healthy individual.  However, not being at 100% could be deadly in a SHTF scenario.  Also, since prevention it is just basic hygiene, Salmonella poisoning prevention is very achievable.

E. faecalis

E. faecalis is caused through chicken feces. What is especially worying is that an that an outbreak can poison your water supply.

Just like the Salmonella, E. faecalis is thought to be transmitted to humans by way of the bird or chicken feces. The bacterium would then spread in the surroundings, even into the water. And any human that comes into contact directly with the poultry or with the dirt would become a likely victim. 4 Human Diseases Caused By Chickens | Survival Life

E. faecalis causes UTI distress, which if uncontrolled could be potentially fatal.  However, with proper sanitation and hygiene it can be avoided.

H. capsulatum

This is an airborne disease that can potentially cause breathing disorders, like tubecurlosis.  So,  an outbreak could be potentially chronic and deadly.

H. capsulatum can live happily in moist places, but will most likely be present in environments where poultry animals are kept, particularly their coops. This specific fungus comes also from the droppings of chicken. They populate the air as spores and enter the human body through the respiratory system. 4 Human Diseases Caused By Chickens | Survival Life

H. capsulatum though can be prevented by regular cleaning of chicken coops and wearing a surgical mask around the chicken coops.

Campylobacter

This is another potential issue that causes GI type symptoms.  However, it’s spread by cooking infected meat.  The symptoms of Campylobacter are quite nasty.

Campylobacter has effects on humans similar to those of Salmonella. Infected humans would suffer severe symptoms like diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, and fever. Exposure to them could also cause lessened immunity which could lead to more complications. 4 Human Diseases Caused By Chickens | Survival Life

However, it is easily preventable by just properly cooking the chicken.

To protect yourself against these infections, you have to make sure you cook your chickens to a crisp first. Also, if you own backyard chickens, make sure to always prepare some antibiotics as part of your first aid kit at home. 4 Human Diseases Caused By Chickens | Survival Life

Thoughts

All of the above diseases are easily preventable with proper hygiene, sanitation and making sure your chicken is thoroughly cooked.  So, just clean up the chicken feces, clean your chicken coops and use common sense and you should be fine.